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I've had my lop for about six years now. He's always been EXCELLENT about using his litter box. Over the past year or two, he's been terrible; peeing everywhere in and out of his cage. He's been to the vet countless times, been on Baytril, etc and he's still a mess; I can't figure out what his problem is.

I'm fully cleaning out his cage every day now. He's had to have baths (wet and dry) because of how often his feet are covered in urine. He has the beginning of urine scalding on his back feet now. I'm trying Neosporin, but I feel like it won't do much good if I can't keep him from peeing all over the place in the meantime.

He has a lame front leg, but gets around just fine, so I don't think that's the problem. I'm trying to give him more nutritious veggies to munch on in the hope that it's more his diet than anything else.

At this point, I just don't know what to do; I can't seem to find a lower litter pan that would be easier for him to get in an out of, though I don't think it would matter since he's in and out of his litter box all the time. I've tried changing his litter, but that doesn't seem to matter; he pees everywhere no matter the litter texture.

I don't want to take the litter pan away, but I can't think of what else would help; I feel like he's cornered in his cage now; surrounded in a sea of his own urine. I don't want to disrupt how his life has been for the past six years by taking the pan away, but I feel like we're both going to go crazy if something doesn't change.



( 9 comments — Leave a comment )
Dec. 19th, 2010 03:41 pm (UTC)
Is he neutered?
Dec. 19th, 2010 08:22 pm (UTC)
Dec. 19th, 2010 03:43 pm (UTC)
Maybe he's just getting old and having more trouble getting into the box, especially with the one bum leg. Can you make one side a lower than the others to make it easier on him?
Dec. 19th, 2010 08:23 pm (UTC)
That's what I'm guessing -- he's just an older guy now. Poor boy!
Dec. 20th, 2010 12:25 am (UTC)
My female just turned 6 last month. I know how you're feeling, we're going to have to hit the vet this week cause she's got weird eye issues.
Dec. 19th, 2010 06:20 pm (UTC)
Unless you've had him since he was a baby, he's in senior bun territory now, and sometimes incontinence happens in older buns. Older rabbits can get lazy in their litter box habits as well, especially if they have any physical issues that hamper movement or cause them pain. They'd rather pee where they're at or pee on a soft spot than move to a litterbox.

Possible solutions:

1. Switch to a litter tray instead of a box; a large cookie sheet with sides works very well as a litter tray. You may also want to increase the number of litterboxes/litter trays you use; older buns can't always get to a litterbox in time like they used to.

2. Switch to a cage with a wire floor and a litter tray underneath, so urine and feces fall through and don't come in contact with bunny paws (you can buy plastic covers for wire floors that protect bunny feet while still allowing feces/urine to pass through).

3. Some people buy disposable diapers made for premature infants and adapt them to fit their rabbits. The diapers absorb the urine and help prevent urine scald. It's a drastic measure, but sometimes necessary.

Hope this helps!

Dec. 19th, 2010 08:27 pm (UTC)
I think I got him when he was about...eight months old? He's been neutered ever since and has always been awesome about the litter box. Do you think it would be detrimental to take away the litter box and revert to just putting litter on the bottom of his cage again? I stopped because he'd always just shove the litter out of the way and lay on the bare floor, but now I'm wondering if it would be better for him. Any suggestions on handling urine scald on his feet? I feel terrible for him and I can't seem to get ahead of it; we're in a vicious cycle now -- he pees on the floor, his feet get worse, I give him a bath (which isn't good for the skin on his feet), he does it again...it's never ending.
Dec. 19th, 2010 10:16 pm (UTC)
I would give the tray a try first, with some old towels (or an old sheet folded up) for him to lounge on. If the litter's completely covering his cage, it might increase the chance of him sitting in a wet spot. Towels/sheets can be switched out and/or washed if he pees on them.

My ex-boss put a wire mesh (I think it was called 3/8" hardware cloth) over her rabbits' litter box to keep her rabbits from sitting directly on the litter; the holes were large enough to allow urine/feces to pass through, but too small to put pressure on the rabbits' feet. You can do that with a shallow tray as well.

Personally, I have always done well with the wire cage floor w/litter tray underneath. I have owned rabbits for 20 years, and never had one develop urine scald or sore feet. I use grass mats and the floor covers I described to keep his feet from getting sore, but I find my rabbit will often lounge on the wire floor anyway.

As to dealing with urine scald, unfortunately I've never had to deal with it, so I'm not sure as to the best way to handle it. I've heard Neosporin is the best way to get the skin to heal, so the only thing I can say is to maybe keep going with it. Hope any of that helps.
Dec. 19th, 2010 08:55 pm (UTC)
You might just have to cover the whole floor of the cage with litter/bedding.

I have a 10-year-old rabbit who hasn't been using his litterbox reliably for the past year or so. For a while, his accidents were infrequent enough that laying down towels was fine. But they got worse and worse, so I ditched the litterbox, moved him into a cage with a deep tray, and covered the whole floor with litter and hay. It's been working out really well :). I spot clean daily and change out the whole tray of litter when needed.

Sometimes senior rabbits just become lazy with litterbox habits (or they simply lose control of those functions). In my rabbit's case, he had no other health problems, just like yours.
( 9 comments — Leave a comment )

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